Thursday, April 21, 2016

COLLEGE STUDENTS: Check out your future.

  Access to a reasonable level of security through basic wages and opportunities for advancement, benefits, and labor protections is being chipped away. Corporate profits may have skyrocketed in recent years, but wages have hardly budged. 


Between 1973 - 2014, national productivity grew at a rate of 7.8 times that of employee compensation. 


At the same time, benefits have been slashed. 


Take pensions, for example: a mainstay fixture in yesteryear America, pensions, which guaranteed employers would provide for employees in retirement, comprised 62 percent of retirement plans in 1979 but were a mere seven 7 percent in 2011. 


401(k)s were used to shift the responsibility of saving for retirement from employers to employees, and the result has been disastrous.



The median working-age family now holds a mere $5,000 in its retirement accounts.




Grimmer still are the prospects of part-time, contract, and temporary workers to whom no benefits are offered, who have no picket line. 

These workers often independently shoulder the burden of protecting themselves from misfortune, financing their own health insurance and retirement with no paid medical leave, no workers’ compensation, and no unemployment benefits

Meanwhile, several recent local and state initiatives to boost earnings for low-wage workers have been tied to the employee-employer relationship, excluding those with less traditional (though increasingly common) work arrangements. Consequently, such initiatives were antiquated at inception. This has long been a method by which corporations shirk responsibility for the well-being of their workers—that is, never technically employing them in the first place.

Clipped from New America Foundation at https://www.newamerica.org/weekly/can-you-hear-them-now/

Saturday, April 9, 2016

GREAT JOB. SEE THE WORLD. GET KILLED.

JOB POSTING

CONFLICT ZONE 
CORRESPONDENT

The Washington Post is planning to add a correspondent to the foreign staff  to help us cover the conflicts in the Middle East and beyond that are upending lives, redrawing borders and otherwise reshaping the world. 

This is the opportunity to tell some of the most important stories of our times, and to address issues central to U.S. security. The mission would likely include helping to cover the conflicts in Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan, but it could well extend to other trouble spots, including parts of Africa. We are seeking versatile, highly accomplished candidates whose work demonstrates an ability to take on just about any journalistic challenge and pull it off – as a parachute artist who can plunge confidently into new terrain; as a digger and source-builder able to illuminate hard targets; as a reporter who can elevate daily coverage of big running stories; as a writer with the gifts to make people and places come alive.
Any candidate should bring experience in covering conflicts, and the strongest will have experience in the Middle East or Afghanistan. Arabic-language skills are not required but would be a plus. At a time when the United States is 15 years into its ‘Long War’ against Islamist extremism, the new correspondent would be based in a location that allows good proximity to the most important of those conflicts, joining a distinguished team that includes Post correspondents already  based in Beirut, Baghdad, Jerusalem, Cairo, Islamabad/Kabul and Nairobi. 
Keeping our correspondents safe is vitally important to us, and applicants should expect to work closely with us to mitigate the risks inherent in covering conflict. 
Interested candidates should contact Douglas Jehl (douglas.jehl@washpost.com), Mary Beth Sheridan (mary.sheridan@washpost.com) or Tracy Grant (tracy.grant@washpost.com) by April 22.

    Wednesday, January 20, 2016

    Yeah, You Are Getting Screwed.

    Believe it or not, there was a time when the CEO earned only 39 times more than the average worker

    Believe it or not, there was a time when the CEO earned only 39 times more than the average worker
    U.S. CEO pay in relation to the average worker's wage
    Source: Thomas Piketty, and Emanuel Saez. 2007. “Income Inequality in the United States, 1913-2002.” In Anthony B. Atkinson, and Thomas Piketty, Top Incomes Over the Twentieth Century. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    Wednesday, January 13, 2016

    How to Get Ahead: Lie, Cheat and Steal | LinkedIn

    How to Get Ahead: Lie, Cheat and Steal | LinkedIn: How to Get Ahead: Lie, Cheat and Steal

    For nearly 20 years, I've been listening to various theories about why companies have been so clueless in serving the needs of their customers... and why it often is so frustrating to work for a large, "successful" company.
    I'd like to suggest that the #1 cause of both problems is the same: companies often empower the employees who - in countless small ways - lie, cheat and steal.
    Reward takers, ignore givers?
    To use Wharton professor Adam Grant's estimates, about 35% of the business workforce is comprised of takers. These are folks who are out for their own interest. Among their numbers are leaders who are driven more by ego than empathy. Some are self-promoters who are quick to take credit for the work of others, who twist reality to suit their interests, and who care about power more than people.
    Yes, I'm being brutally honest here.
    The vast majority of "customer-focused" initiatives reek of a taker mindset. Most of them are nothing more than thinly-veiled efforts to boost sales and/or automate marketing. They do not think of customers' interests first. They do not give major new benefits or services to customers. They seek to take more money out of people's wallets.
    In short, these initiatives were designed by takers, and if you are a giver it is enormously frustrating to deal with the hypocrisy that surrounds you: your company says it wants to help customers, but its policies and procedures are designed to take from customers, not give to them.
    Is "lie, cheat and steal" too strong?
    The taking mentality creates systems that make it so hard for customers to stand up for themselves that it's easy for companies to "legally" lie, cheat and steal from them. Don Peppers and Martha Rogers superb book, Extreme Trust, details many such examples, even if their language is a bit more polite than mine.
    One such example is charging customers monthly for services they haven't used in a very long time. (That's a big shoutout to Yahoo and Stamps.com.) It would be easy for such companies to proactively do the right thing - contact each customer and ask if everything is alright - but it is more profitable to remain silent and collect the cash.
    Likewise, is it stealing when you take credit for the best ideas of your subordinates? Yep. Is it cheating when you blame subordinates for your own misjudgments? Yep.
    Putting takers in charge of customer experience is like asking a bear to guard your honey.
    The solution: hire, promote and empower givers
    If you really, truly want to grow your company faster than your competitors, hire, promote and empower givers.
    Givers are people who think of other people before they think of themselves. They are the people who should be designing and running customer-focused initiatives. They are the folks who have the vision and ability to grow revenues, because they are focused on the needs of others.
    Help us test this theory
    Adam Grant, Dane Barnes and myself are working on an online assessment that will allow companies to not only identify honest-to-goodness givers, but also evaluate other critical skills necessary for the owners of successful customer-based initiatives. These are qualities such as motivation, initiative, and a growth mindset.
    The assessments won't be ready until later this summer, but we're reserving spots for companies who wish to be part of our beta test of this assessment program (it's free, in return for your feedback.) Let me know if your company would like to participate, and I'll be glad to provide you with details. My contact information is at the end of this quick summary:
    _____________________________________________________
    Bruce Kasanoff is co-author with Michael Hinshaw of Smart Customers, Stupid Companies. Bruce also has free ebook guides available at Kasanoff.com.

    To see more of Bruce's articles on LinkedIn, click the "follow" button below, or follow@NowPossible on Twitter.

    Tuesday, January 12, 2016

    How My Job Saved Me — Medium

    “No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader.” — Robert Frost

    Before
    you roll your eyes at the idealistic nature of this title, know this
    about me – I’m not one of those people who skips dinner to stay at the
    office until 9:30 PM. I’m not the guy who won’t shut up about his job in
    between sips of Guinness at Friday’s Happy Hour.
    But do I love my job? Absolutely. Not only is my job itself extremely fulfilling, but I believe in what I’m doing, and more importantly, the people with whom I’m doing it with.
    But
    I also love having my toes in the sand and ending up with a spotty
    sunburn. I love seeking out awful horror movies on Netflix and laughing
    at their absurdity. I enjoy splitting a six pack with a close friend on
    the back porch, with nothing but Duane Allman’s slide guitar to color
    the gaps between our fits of laughter.
    In other words, I’m just like you. And that’s how this story begins.“No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader.” — Robert Frost
    Before
    you roll your eyes at the idealistic nature of this title, know this
    about me – I’m not one of those people who skips dinner to stay at the
    office until 9:30 PM. I’m not the guy who won’t shut up about his job in
    between sips of Guinness at Friday’s Happy Hour.
    But do I love my job? Absolutely. Not only is my job itself extremely fulfilling, but I believe in what I’m doing, and more importantly, the people with whom I’m doing it with.
    But
    I also love having my toes in the sand and ending up with a spotty
    sunburn. I love seeking out awful horror movies on Netflix and laughing
    at their absurdity. I enjoy splitting a six pack with a close friend on
    the back porch, with nothing but Duane Allman’s slide guitar to color
    the gaps between our fits of laughter.
    In other words, I’m just like you. And that’s how this story begins.


    How My Job Saved Me — Medium: How My Job Saved Me
    My struggle with loss, identity, and finding purpose again.

    Saturday, January 2, 2016

    Don't Let Collection Agencies Bully You

    Guess What?
    That Collection Agency Cannot Do What they say they Can Do.

    1. They cannot contact you at “inconvenient” hours.
    2. You can write a letter and tell them to stop contacting you at all (unless they are going to file a lawsuit and, remember, these guys aren’t making enough off you to pay a lawyer. They’re just going to sell the debt down to the nickle-on-the-dollar guys.)
    3 A debt collector cannot call your place of work and, if you have an attorney, they can only contact the attorney.
    4. Did they send you a registered “validation letter” confirming that you owe the money within 5 days of first contacting you? Bet you they didn’t—neither of the bozos who contacted me ever did.
    5. They absolutely CANNOT use loud or threatening language, keep calling you day and night, threaten to publicize your debt, threaten to tell your employer. Basically, all those things that they are already doing are against the law. If you simply indicate that you are aware of your rights; they lose most of their power to terrify.
    In the end, all they can really do is put a black mark on your credit rating. You can survive that.
    Now I’ve been in both situations—where I knew I didn’t owe the money and where I was fairly sure that I did owe the money. Even when I paid, the bastards still put a record in the credit record so there’s really no hurry. If you can do it, I’d say pay them the money. If you really can’t, use the law to make them go away.
    By the way, sometimes they say they’re a law firm—heck, they may even be a law firm. It doesn’t make any difference.

    Friday, January 1, 2016

    Woody Guthrie’s Illustrated List of Thirty-Three New Year’s Resolutions for 1942

    This illustrated list of thirty-three New Year’s resolutions that Woody Guthrie made for 1942 really gives insight into what drove this brilliant and prolific singer, songwriter and activist. Of the thirty-three resolutions, here are a few of the more notable ones.
    • 1. Work more and better
    • 3. Wash teeth if any
    • 7. Drink scant if any
    • 16. Learn people better
    • 20. Dream good
    • 25. Play and sing good
    • 27. Help win war – beat fascism
    • 31. Love everybody
    • 33. Wake up and fight
    Woody Guthrie's 1942 Resolutions

    Woody Guthrie’s Illustrated List of Thirty-Three New Year’s Resolutions for 1942:

    Woody Guthrie’s Illustrated List of Thirty-Three New Year’s Resolutions for 1942

    Thursday, December 31, 2015

    15 Dating Tips From 'Game of Thrones'


    15 Dating Tips From 'Game of Thrones'


    If you're looking for advice on where to take your girlfriend on a romantic dinner or how to surprise your boyfriend for your anniversary, you can consult traditional dispensaries of dating wisdom, like Cosmo or your older brother.
    If you're more concerned about overcoming the rough patches, then you should turn to Game of Thrones for relationship advice.
    Sure, not all the unions on GoT are ones you want to imitate. (Looking at you, Lannisters.) However, every couple on the show is dealing with obstacles way bigger than your lover's Polka passion. If Daenerys and Drogo can work past a language barrier and an arranged marriage (his death notwithstanding) you can probably get through your girlfriend's semester in Italy.
    • 1. Be willing to try new things for them.

      Game-of-thrones-heart
      Raw hearts might not be your thing, but just think of it as repayment for taking him to that chick flick.
      Image: Tumblr jennywilliamson
    • 2. Don't feel pressured to be exclusive.

      Game-of-thrones-free-woman
      Sure your father might be forcing you to take a bride, but that doesn't mean you have to break up with your girlfriend right away.
      Image: Tumblr plunksterdalektardis
    • 3. Always give the benefit of the doubt in a pop culture reference argument -- even when you know for a fact that you're right.

      Game-of-thrones-known
      No on likes a know-it-all.
      Image: Tumblr gottabeaviolist
    • 4. Don't be too proud to ask for help.

      Game-of-thrones-jon
      You might be self-sufficient, but if your girlfriend understands the culture and terrain of your new surroundings, take her up on a crash course.
      Image: Tumblr adriennefromthefuture
    15 Dating Tips From 'Game of Thrones'

    Monday, December 28, 2015

    "We now, as a whole, have a one-second-shorter attention span than a goldfish. Isn’t that interesting?"



    2016 Resume Trends – The New, The Now & What You Must Know


      

    2016 Resume Trend #4: Use A Formula To Help Flesh Out Your Story

    2016 Resume Trend #6: Personal Branding IS Visual TOO
    2016 Resume Trend #7: Bite-Sized Sentences

    Thursday, December 24, 2015

    Unemployment Sucks

    Yes, unemployment sucks.
    It is a Bad Thing.
    It will mean A More Difficult Future.
    It is often the End of A Dream,

    Fortunately, it’s not the end of the world.

    Getting a leg blown off in Afghanistan sucks,
    your kids flunking out of school sucks,
    getting sued for a couple of million because your dog bit a downtown lawyer sucks,
    discovering you have cancer sucks,
    discovering that your wife or your kids have cancer sucks even worse.

    Listen, I cried in public two of the times I was canned, I wake up in the middle of the night and start going through all the terrible things that could happen to me and my family now that I’m without a job, I’m pretty well defined by my work so being without a job with responsibility and respect takes a big chunk out of my ego; if I wasn’t raised by a raging alcoholic, I’d probably have one or two nights of solid drinking and bemoaning the unfairness of the universe.

    So give yourself a break, rend your garments, cover your head with ashes and bemoan your fate. Bitch and moan, tell the family dog how your boss is a moron and how everyone was after you and how no one understood what a great job you did and how it’s all just so unfair.

    OK, all done?

    Now suck it up and deal with it.